Fourth visit to Cheju-do

 

These are pictures taken during my fourth visit to Cheju-do. I was invited to help the people of the National Museum in Cheju-do to translate and classify material they had bought in Holland, but they also wanted to look for the place where the Sperwer had stranded. The weather almost made it impossible to do so, since there was a taiphoon, which was the cause of many problems in the museum, but also elsewhere.

Anyhow, instead of staying in a resort with out respective families, we went one day later, and followed the coast, while the respective families made other plans.

Our first stop was in Aewôl which Hamel describes in his journal, he writes about a small harbor and a small fortress. The harbor is still there and remains of the fortress as well. (images 34~ 38 and 86 Miss Ahn, 90 Mr. Kim, 93 Mr. Choi.) We continued our journey on the way to the beach I had found before, and when we arrived at the place called Dae Mul, we had a vivid discussion if this was the right beach or not.

Dae Mul can be found in pictures 29, 30, 32. They are three places/caves where water seeps out, but according to me, the beach itself was not the place Hamel describes (18, 19, 21, 22, 24~28, 31 ,57~61). There are too many rocks to make it reasonable that a ship strands there and a number of the crew is thrown out and survives. Also Hamel was writing about a beach and this is in my Dutch opinion not a beach. I couldn't find the place back which I described in my other visit and I was rather frustrated because of that.

We went to Daejông after having a lunch to take a look at the remains of the fortress there, to look for other possible beaches and occasionally ask for the road at a house (62) where there was a beautiful collection of Bonsai or Bunjae in Korean. We took some pictures in Daejông (63~65, 67~70) and across from the sign about the harubang there was a wonderful but delapitated old traditional Korean house (72).

We went back to the beach to measure the distance between the beach and the fortress which was 14 Km, twice the distance Hamel describes.

Mr. Kim pointed out that the tide made it possible that the ship could wreck there anyhow, but I was still sceptical. (71, 73~76, 78). Again we had a discussion about the whole issue (87, 92) and we set course to the harbor to take a boat to explore the coast. Just after we drove a little bit up north I recognized the place where the other beach was (79~83) and since we were late, we couldn't explore it in detail and my film was finished as well, but this was the beach.

Mr. Kim had a few objections. He said that the people could not be spotted because of the high cliffs, but according to me the wreck could be seen easily from the watch tower on the hill behind the cliffs. He also said that Hamel didn't write about the cliffs nor the islands which could be seen from this beach, but not from the one he mentioned. In my opinion the island couldnot be easily recognized as an island, since the end dissappeared around the corner and therefore could be part of the mainland.

We went after that to the harbor (39~42) to see the situation from the sea. (1~17, 20, 23, 33, 43~56, 66, 77, 88). The map opens in a new window so that it is easier to switch between the different windows to see how the situation is.

The next day we went to look for the place where Hamel and his crew lived during their stay in Cheju city. (83~85) The original house is completely rebuilt in all kinds of small shops, but the roofs are still the original roofs, so that we could only see the situation from the building on the other site of the street.

Mr. Choi thought for one moment that the building at the corner on the other side of the street could also be the place where the house had been (85) but Mr. Kim assured us later that this was not the case.



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